Posts tagged VBAC

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Last month we saw the pre-release of a homebirth meta-analysis piece that claimed worse outcomes for babies born at home than in the hospital. I wrote about it and the ensuing Lancet insult to women’s rights here.  Decades of well-conducted research does in fact support the safety of planned homebirth for women and babies, although here in the US the research has fallen on deaf ears among physicians, their trade union ACOG, and hospitals. In light of the solid new research of the past few years clearly demonstrating the safety of homebirth, how likely is it that “evidence” will ever win the medical industry’s approval of midwife-attended homebirth? I am doubtful. Here’s why.

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This woman’s story could be told by tens of thousands of American women, but it is her story, her triumph as an individual woman that will inspire others. Like this warrior mama, too many women are coerced or led into cesareans for “failed inductions” and/or babies that “cannot fit” through their pelvises. Many of these women go on to birth even larger babies at home the next time around. Our stories give rise to our own courage and power as women and mothers, and they can also transform the lives of women listening, who may have gone through a similar journey.


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An OB candidly shares her remarkable journey though three inductions, two cesareans,  two vacuum assisted births, and one unplanned VBAC. Now a VBAC advocate, she shared her story on her blog:

My Surprise VBAC

“Needless to say, like most OB residents, my experience with normal, low-risk physiological birth was minimal……..Reflecting back over my journey, I see how much the field of obstetrics has managed to contribute and sometimes outright cause complications, all the while assuming they are just keeping everyone safer.  And I see how much fear has overtaken the natural birthing process.  I’ve said before that shows like Deliver Me, A Baby Story, and Birth Day should be renamed “Fear Factor” because they play on a woman’s often natural concerns about the birth by portraying the whole process as highly dramatic, with a woman strapped down and hooked up…..”